Filed under News

Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






For the first time in nearly six decades, the leader of Cuba is not named Castro. After a secret vote in the National Assembly, Miguel Díaz-Canel was announced as Raúl Castro’s successor. 603 members of the 604 person National Assembly voted in favor of Díaz-Canel.

While Castro’s brother Fidel Castro lead Cuba for 50 years, Raúl now professedly believes that Cuban presidents should be restricted to two five-year terms. Castro will remain the head of the communist party, but will officially step aside in 2021 and elevate Díaz-Canel to the post.

Díaz-Canel has close ties to the Castro family. In 1997, Díaz-Canel became the youngest ever Poltiburo member, one of Castro’s 14 senior advisors. He also served in the military, including in an attachment that provided personal security to the Castro brothers themselves. The Castro’s elevated Díaz-Canel through the ranks and have personally tapped him to carry on their legacy.

To some, Díaz-Canel represents the change in vanguard from the original Cuban revolutionaries to a younger generation taking hold in Cuba, despite Díaz-Canel’s age of 57 years. However, many see Díaz-Canel’s ascendance as an extension of Castro rule. Díaz-Canel himself has done little to dispel these rumors by saying he will retain Castro’s cabinet until at least July.

“I confirm to this assembly that Raul Castro, as first secretary of the Communist Party, will lead the decisions about the future of the country,” Diaz-Canel said, according to the Washington Post.

Castro has overseen significant change in Cuba. He is known as a reformer who opened the island up to the internet and cellphone usage and put in place policies that encourage growth in the private sector. Cuba is now home to one of the world’s fastest growing airports and a booming real estate market.

Castro will also be remembered for his part in the historic thawing between Cuba and the United States in 2015. While the relationship has faltered under the Trump Administration, Cuba has seen a huge increase in tourism.

Unfortunately, these reforms have had very little impact on Cuba’s human rights record. The Freedom House, an independent watchdog organization dedicated to the spread of democracy, ranks Cuba as “Not Free” for the country’s lack of a free press, and economic and political freedoms. Detention of dissenters and political activists remain high.

As this political shift takes shape, many Cubans wait with baited breath to see what the future of their country holds.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

    News

    Man Kicked out of Bar for Wearing ‘Make America Great Again’ Hat

  • Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

    News

    Four Shot, One Dead in a “Gathering of Souls”

  • Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

    News

    Accused Parkland Shooter to Donate Inheritance to Victims

  • Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

    News

    Blackout Hits Puerto Rico

  • Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

    News

    Good News for Coffee Drinkers

  • Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

    News

    7 Inmates Killed, 17 Others Injured in South Carolina Prison Riot

  • Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

    News

    Mark Zuckerburg Testifies on Capitol Hill

  • Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

    News

    Paul Ryan Announces He Will Not Run for Re-election

  • Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

    News

    Canadian Junior Hockey Team Loses 15 Players in Tragic Bus Crash

  • Cuba Looks to the Future With New President

    News

    Cleveland Star Kyle Korver Suffers Loss of Brother

Cuba Looks to the Future With New President